12 Principles Adapted To The Computer.

Timing – This has been used to show the age difference between the lamps. The older lamp takes more time, whereas the younger lamp does. This lets us know the age difference between the lamps.

Arcs of motion – The smaller lamp uses this technique when jumping on the ball. It is a perfect arc, just like how someone would jump in real life, which adds to the believability.

Slow in and slow out – We see this principle being used when the ball rolls past the screen. It starts off fast then slows down near the end. This gives us a sense of reality.

Squash and stretch – We see this principle being used when the small lamp bounces up and down on the ball.

Anticipation – We see this principle being used when the big lamp rolls the ball off screen, then waits for the ball to roll back to him.

Staging – The background is dark with the characters in the light which automatically puts them in focus.

Exaggeration – We see this being used when the small lamp is repeatedly bouncing on the ball and when he tries to hold his balance on it.

Appeal – The clip is appealing in many ways, the main way is the way in which the small lamp acts. It acts like a cute little child which makes you want to watch the clip all the way through to see how his mischief will turn out.

Secondary action – We see this when the large lamp looks sad, it looks down and hunches its back.

Follow through and overlapping action – We see this when the little lamp bounds off the screen and the wire still wriggles.

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